Nielsen’s Gracenote adds predictive content analytics

Audience Predict will forecast future program performance.



Gracenote, the content solutions division of marketing measurement firm Nielsen, has unveiled a new tool, Audience Predict, which will deliver predictive insights into future entertainment programming performance. The aim is to support strategic decision-making by content owners and distributors.


Audience Predict will apply machine learning to data from two sources: Gracenote’s content metadata and Nielsen’s audience measurement data. It will not only forecast size of audience, reach and likely minutes spent viewing, but will also predict the composition of the audience — in other words who will watch. Content owners and distributors will be able to make informed decisions on platforms for their content and also deliver a value proposition to ad buyers.


Why we care. Is it time to say TV has caught up with digital? Streaming TV — linear TV too — are getting smarter. And this is important as the mass audience for TV programming becomes increasingly fragmented. There may be a few network shows left with large audiences advertisers can easily understand. Outside that dwindling oasis, we have countless shows on countless channels attracting niche but valuable audiences. Understanding those audiences would seem to be very important.


The post Nielsen’s Gracenote adds predictive content analytics appeared first on MarTech.

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About The Author










Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space. He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020. Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.

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