Tracking remote workers doesn’t make them more productive. Here’s what it does instead

 

By Shalene Gupta

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase, famously ripped into remote work earlier this year, claiming it adds to procrastination. Owl Labs, which creates 360 video conferencing, surveyed 2,300 employees on the state of remote work to find out what’s really up. Despite Dimon’s office-centric stance, the survey found that procrastination is not the biggest issue that employers should be concerned about when it comes to WFH or hybrid employees. Rather, it’s lack of trust. Here are the survey’s key findings:

    Employee surveillance has increased: 37% of employers have added or increased employee tracking software since the start of the pandemic. Unsurprisingly, 45% of employees are stressed out about being tracked by their employer. 

    Employees are passionate about defending their right to work from home: 46% said if they can’t work from home they would “quiet quit” and put in less effort, while 39% said they’d quit for real. Meanwhile, 52% said they’d be willing to take a pay cut of 5% or more to be able to choose where they could work.

    Getting to the office is expensive: On average, employees spend $862 a month when they work at the office versus $431 when they work remotely. Three in four workers have said they would go to the office more often if their employers paid for commuting and parking. 

 

Tracking remote workers doesn’t make them more productive. Here’s what it does instead

The survey of full-time U.S. workers was done in collaboration with Global Workplace Analytics in July 2022. You can see the full results here.

Fast Company

(8)