Your Team is Virtual. What Do You Do About Pictures?

Remember when everyone who worked together sat in the same office? I am not even talking about pre-pandemic here. I mean, remember when having a job always meant getting up, putting on clothes (likely panty hose if you are a woman) driving in traffic, and going into an office? That simply isn’t the world we live in anymore. Instead, many of us roll out of bed, brush our teeth for 20 second, try to get the toothpaste off our chin, and log onto our computer. A lot has changed…but here is one thing that hasn’t. Viewers of your website, particularly if you are a professional services organization, want to see your “About” page. They want a sense of who you are. They want to see your faces and know you–if they are planning to hire you.

This presents a challenge: How do firms that work virtually get pictures to share on their “Team” page? After all, you’ll never have an opportunity for a group photo shoot at the company picnic or annual retreat.

At Spring Insight, we devised a rather brilliant (and fun–if I say so myself) work around for this little problem. The funny thing is that when we came up with the idea, I had no idea what a useful hack it really was. Our first team pictures were actually taken in person. Though the Spring Insight team is virtual, we had come together for a two day meeting and which included a session with a photographer who took team shots. All of our pictures were taken at a playground on playground equipment.

In the years that have followed, that has worked out remarkably well. When someone new starts with the team, one of their first assignments is to go to a playground and get a picture (or selfie) that we can use on our team page. Are the subsequent, less-formal selfie pictures as polished as the ones we took with a professional photographer? No. But, at least we can always represent a new team member on the website.

So, am I suggesting that every company take team photographs at the playground? I actually think that is a great idea, but I am not. What I am saying is to think about creating a context for your team photos that can be easily reproduced as your team grows and changes. Are there places, such as a playground, that everyone can access? Are there types of poses that make sense? Think through how you can create consistent images when the pictures are taken at different times and different places.

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Author: Erika Dickstein

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