An Entrepreneur’s Guide to Business Growth

— October 31, 2016

Part 3 – Business Development


Over the past few weeks, we’ve looked at how you can use inbound marketing tactics to help a new business grow.


We outlined the steps you could take to implement an inbound marketing plan, and we looked at ways to launch your sales strategy.


Today we’ll conclude by exploring some of the things you should do in the early days of your business, and how inbound marketing can help you get them done.


An Entrepreneur’s Guide to Business Growth


1. Set Up Your Website


This one should go without saying. Even if you’re not ready to go to market with your product or service, you need a website to establish credibility and provide your audience with information about your company. Register a domain name. This is an investment. A business with a free hosting name or a Yahoo e-mail address can suggest that you don’t plan on sticking around.


2. Establish Yourself On Social Media


Again, this is a given: No matter what your company makes or does, you’ll need a social media presence. Set up accounts on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. now, and you’ll have an easier time marketing on them later.


3. Be Ready To Go Mobile


As the owner of a new business, you’re going to be on the go quite a bit, so it may be time to upgrade your smartphone. If you’re running a small retail business, you may want to invest in a credit card swipe device to accept payments on your phone.


And while you’re thinking about your new smartphone, be sure to think about your customers’ phones as well. Many of them will use their mobile devices to find your website, which is why it’s important to have a site built with responsive design. That means your site can adapt to whatever platform it’s being viewed on: desktop, smartphone, tablet, etc.


4. Scour Your Networks


Connect with former co-workers, as well as your friends and relatives. The idea isn’t to turn them into customers, but to maybe get them to make introductions, or help with other things on this list. You should also connect with your local Small Business Administration or other small business organizations to get some free guidance.


5. Hone Your Elevator Pitch


You don’t want an elevator pitch that makes the person listening to you feel like they’re trapped in the elevator. Being able to pitch your business in a way that’s clear and quick and engaging is important for attracting customers, investors and new employees.


6. Start Hiring Employees


You can’t help your business grow if you’re taking care of everything on your own. You might be able to outsource some of your work to freelancers and third party vendors in the case of service businesses, but a retail company will need extra workers right away.


7. Refine Your Marketing Approach


As you step into the marketplace, listen to what customers are saying. Use their feedback to refine your product/service, but also to refine how you talk about it based on the needs of your customers.

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Author: Greg Cawood


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