Marketing Strategy: Staying The Course




  • May 30, 2015

    Whenever a company hires a social media marketing manager, either internally or through an outside agency, they are entrusting them to promote their brand, image, or service to a diverse audience across the wide spectrum of social media platforms; usually given carte blanche when it comes to the content posted. However, are they always keeping the best interests of their employers (or clients) and those of the brand’s fan base in mind?


    I recently came across a Facebook page for a local business. Since I was interested in the service they provided, I liked their page and began following it. Unfortunately, my initial interest quickly waned due to constant posts about sports which had no bearing on the company or its services. It’s not like I hate sports; I have been known to cheer on a favorite team virtually. However, continually posting about the local water polo team on a company’s business page doesn’t entice me to spend money on that business’ products or services. It might, however, cause me to buy season tickets to the matches being held at the local swim center. I don’t think that was the original intent of the company’s social media marketing strategy.


    This is not an isolated incident. More and more, personal preference seems to be permeating throughout posted social media content. We have all been told that marketing on social media needs to be kept light and friendly. The hard sell approach is as much of a turn off as continual posts of the office cat or the boss’ Caribbean cruise. We need to engage our followers in a conversation; a conversation that’s relevant to the brand or business. Targeting your content is one thing; but targeting it in a way that it does not benefit the company or brand that you represent is a big marketing misstep.


    Clearly, there is nothing terribly wrong with an occasional post featuring the office mascot or pictures of the receptionist’s new baby. In fact, they do tend to lend a human touch to our marketing. It all comes down to knowing when the conversation has completely strayed off course. Being creative in your posts and finding a way to showcase Fluffy with one of your products or services will keep your marketing strategy on track while at the same time keeping the conversation light and whimsical.


    There is also nothing wrong with the occasional sharing of a post by another page. While it shows that you are willing to be an active participant in their social conversation; be wary of it becoming one sided. Your sharing of their posts with no reciprocity on their part simply turns your page into another marketing tool for them; a free one at that.


    Take a hard look at the pages that you follow. Are you seeing irrelevant content popping up more often than you would like?  Are you beginning to second guess why you followed them in the first place? Is your brand loyalty strong enough for you to stick it out?

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